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Frida Friday ATX: Style | Muse 2019

STYLE l MUSE is at the intersection of fashion and art. This special event features live models and art installations all interpreting various Frida Kahlo paintings, while celebrating different styles of fashion.

Tableaux Featured:

  • Sustainability

  • Vintage

  • Pin-Up

  • Urban Street

  • Redux

  • Decadence


Sustainability

The Love Embrace of the Universe, the Earth (Mexico), Myself, Diego, and Señor Xolotl

The Love Embrace of the Universe, the Earth (Mexico), Myself, Diego, and Señor Xolotl

Concept Sketch by Stephanie Jimenez Schiller - @voguevignette

Concept Sketch by Stephanie Jimenez Schiller - @voguevignette

Stylists:

Magdalena Atuña - @selvabeat: Creative Director and Owner/Editor of Selva Beat, an environmental magazine with an edge.

Vanessa Villalva - @ronkitadesign: Professional seamstress with 20+ years experience in marketing, animal welfare, teaching, and creative roles.

Models:

  • Julissa Alheli - @julissa.alheli

  • Sukhi Grewal - @sukhikgrewal

Concept:

In Frida Kahlo’s 1949 work The Love Embrace of the Universe, the Earth, Myself, Diego, and Señor Xolotl, Kahlo acknowledges that her relationship with her husband, Diego Rivera, has gone from romantic to familial, like that of a mother and child. It’s a realization born of necessity but not without heartache. Behind Kahlo, the Mexican Earth fractures as a gesture of empathy.

In our interpretation of this piece, we feel that this nesting doll of grief serves well as a metaphor of man’s pillaging of the Earth and, if we look deeper, the United States’ exploitation of Latinx workers as a tool of said pillaging.

In our tableau, our two models represent the worker, tilling arid land that will no longer yield — neither for themselves nor anyone else. Our color palette, like Kahlo’s, is one of Earth tones: rust, soil, and flora. Though the workers are bound to utilitarian outfitting, their beauty and strength (derived from their ancestral roots) shines through and above all. Our people are resilient, though not without their limits — much like Mother Earth.

Vendors/items:

  • Denim apron - made by Ronkita Design from scrap fabric

  • Reversible Bandeau - made by Ronkita Design from scrap fabric and fabric from Austin Creative Reuse

  • Corset, long suede skirt, hat, slip - thrifted

  • Rust colored pants - stylist’s own

  • Sleeping bundle - vintage 1930’s curtains, stylist’s own

  • Plants - on loan from Ojitos de Pulga, upcycled handy crafts and gifts

  • Mexican blanket - stylist’s own

  • Fabric on stool - sourced from CRAFT, creative hub for DIY crafting, workshops, and event space

 

Vintage

The Two Fridas (1939) by Frida Kahlo

The Two Fridas (1939) by Frida Kahlo

Concept Sketch by Stephanie Jimenez Schiller - @voguevignette

Concept Sketch by Stephanie Jimenez Schiller - @voguevignette

Stylist/Set Designer:

Natalie F. Garza - @velvet.turban: Natalie is an artist, designer, stylist, and 10th generation Texan who descends from founders of the city of San Antonio. Her work explores global cultures combined with modern elements and the juxtaposition of fashion and interior design. Her interior design work has been featured in hotels and restaurants in Dallas and San Antonio as well as magazines like Fashion Dallas, PaperCity Magazine, and First Home by DMagazine. You can find Natalie's pop-up store, Velvet Turban - a collection of vintage resort wear and decor, in markets around Austin including Frida Friday ATX.

Models:

  • Nidia Daniela - @nidiadaniela

  • Ana Maria Rea - @a_rea1

  • Samantha Zelade - @sol_de_agua

Concept:

The Two Fridas was painted after Frida divorces her husband, Diego Rivera, and depicts the two sides of her feelings at that difficult time. In the image of her on the right she’s wearing traditional Mexican clothing which Diego preferred, and in the image of her on the left she is in European style clothing which she would wear when not around him. Frida would do this to rebel against his wishes and the traditional Mexican expectations. She was very torn in this painting. In my interpretation of this piece Frida has reflected and healed from this experience. The models are wearing a blend of patterns and cultural garments from different time periods symbolizing unity and the passing of time. This is also a reinterpretation of what traditional Mexican dress can be - an appreciation of different cultures. Instead of a broken artery between the two Fridas the models are wearing a lasso -- a symbol of unity and eternity in traditional Mexican wedding ceremonies, to symbolize that she is infinitely married to herself and embraced in self love. Frida is being who she wants to be no matter the traditional expectations.

Vendors/items:

  • Clothing, accessories and furnishings are from the Velvet Turban vintage collection. The painting is hand-painted by Natalie. 

  • Flower headpieces by Las Ofrendas (@lasofrendas), prices range from $65-125. 

 

Pin-Up

Viva la Vida (1954) by Frida Kahlo

Viva la Vida (1954) by Frida Kahlo

Stylist/Set Designer:

Leticia Martinez - @Munchies_by_leti: Leticia is an Austin, Texas native with roots and family planted here in Texas for over a century. Her art inspiration comes from memories of her childhood, family, and food. With the sounds of ranchero music her grandpa played in her youth, she creates pieces that bring the nostalgia, love, and snacks together.

Name of Models:

  • Sarah Garnica - @lucientlily

  • Beverly Acosta - @BevInTheMiddle

  • Amanda Chapa - @merri_mandi

Concept:

My concept comes from memories of my childhood where my father would cut sandia outside on our patio surrounded by flowers my mother would plant in our garden. Women painted and dressed colorfully together, like the women in my life would be at every party we had growing up, in the kitchen, being chismosas and enjoying life.

Vendors/Items:

  • Shawl $30+ - Manos Artesanas 

  • Earrings $20 - Munchies By Leti 

  • Necklaces $30 - Munchies By Leti

  • Dress $48 - Velvet Turban 

  • Tree - Stylists own



Urban Street

Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940) by Frida Kahlo

Self-Portrait with Thorn Necklace and Hummingbird (1940) by Frida Kahlo

Concept Sketch by Stephanie Jimenez Schiller - @voguevignette

Concept Sketch by Stephanie Jimenez Schiller - @voguevignette

Stylist/Set Designer:

Noalanii Karakashian - @the_comfychic

Models:

  • Sheila Lopez

  • Maria Montelogo 

  • Nina

Concept:
Known for her self-portrait paintings, Frida Kahlo inspired stylist Noalanii Karakashian on the modernization of self-portraits and the essence of being a Selfie-Queen. Using iconic Latinx brand empowerment tees from Jen Zeano Designs along with new takes on traditional huaraches from Huellas Artisinal and fanny packs by Manos Artesanas with prints from Chiapas, Noalanii wanted to incorporate her Latinx heritage into urban fashion while paying homage to the original Selfie-Queen Frida. 

Frida Kahlo is known for her self-portrait paintings in which she represents different identities, moments in her life, and cultura. This is where stylist Noalanii drew inspiration to showcase each model’s unique identity while owning her Latinidad in modern day. Drawing from cultural references of clicas, chismosas, and comadres, Noalanii presents to the world the beauty in Latina unity (Latinas Unidas) and expressing the individuality of each member of a group. As the term urbano is often negatively associated as low-class within communities of color, Noalanii styled each model in urban street fashion while incorporating traditional Mexican garments with a twist like gold huaraches and fanny packs chiapanecas. Challenging the negative association with the term urbano, Noalanii hopes to highlight how fashion trends that begin in communities of color are often co opted and accepted in the mainstream, yet still looked down upon when worn by WoC like hoop earrings. More than a trend, the stylistic choices by WoC are a way of life. The big hoop earring attitude is a way to convey fierceness, fuerza, chingonatude, and anti-conformity, all which Frida Kahlo embodied.


Vendors/Items:

  • Jen Zeano Designs’ Piel Canela Tee ($30.00), Morena Tee ($32.00), Mas Aventuras Crop Top ($26.00), Confia en la Magica Tumblr ($22.00) and Adios Duffel Bag ($28.00)

  • Hija de tu Madre’s Frida Denim Jacket ($170.00), Jefa Hoops ($58.00), Ansiosa y Preciosa Phone Case ($20.00), La Muy Muy Hand Mirror ($20.99)

  • Luxx Latina Beauty’s Frida Palette *LIMITED EDITION* ($28.00)

  • Las Ofrendas’ Butterfly Crown and Butterfly Clips; Flower headpieces by Las Ofrendas (@lasofrendas), range from $65-125 

  • Manos Artesanos’ Fanny Pack ($35)

  • Huellas Artisinals’ Leather Flower Jacket ($265), Clutch ($75), Shoes ($45)


REDUX

Self Portrait with Cropped Hair (1940) by Frida Kahlo

Self Portrait with Cropped Hair (1940) by Frida Kahlo

Stylists/Set Designer:

Tabitha Hamilton - @nativedreamjewelry
Marisa Amaya - @seafullofelephants
Both Tabitha and Marisa are Austin Natives. We grew up and went to school on the south-eastside of town. We’ve maintained our friendship since elementary school. I believe art is what has kept us together 🌈

Models:

  • April Galindo - @aprilbgalindo

  • Ivory Danay - @ms.ivory_danay

Concept:

Kahlo’s painting ‘Self Portrait with Cropped Hair’ created in 1940 in Mexico after her divorce with husband Diego Rivera inspired the creation of the Tableau Redux. Some say the painting is an expression of Kahlo’s mourning of her divorce however I feel it’s a celebration of her androgynous spirit. Her cropped hair is scattered all over the floor and she’s holding scissors in her hand. Instead of focusing on the darkness of the painting I wanted to highlight the beauty of transformation and embrace the spectrum that is gender. Kahlo loved many humans, both that identified as man and as women. The shedding of her hair represents the detachment of traditionalistic and heteronormative lifestyles so we used red roses to represent the beauty in Kahlo’s forward thinking mindset. To me Kahlo stands out because she often went against the grain of her time- for that she is a trailblazer, an icon, a poderosa.

Vendors/Items:

  • Copper + Turquoise Ring ($51) - Native Dream Jewelry

  • Copper + Larimar Ring ($48) - Native Dream Jewelry

  • Vintage Navajo Sterling Silver Earrings ($95) - Bead it Austin

  • Many set props were sourced courtesy of CRAFT


DECADENCE

Memory, the Heart (1937) by Frida Kahlo

Memory, the Heart (1937) by Frida Kahlo

Co-Art Directors/Stylist:

Stephanie Jimenez Schiller - @voguevignette
TK Tunchez - @lasofrendas

Models: 

  • Diana Paredes @diana._.paredes

  • Ashley Mendez @ashley.mendez

Concept:

“For us, this  piece represents the dance between the multiple identities that make up La Frida at various points in her life. Her longing as a school girl to be a modern Mujer and her desire to represent the indigenous identity that she loves and that Diego favors. As with any woman, there is a constant struggle, Battle, ultimately, a dance between who she is, was, wants to be and hopes for. 

We chose the theme, DECADENCE , as a nod to the style, grace and fierce adornment that Frida, the queer, chingona, self- examining person surrounded herself with. Her meticulously chosen attire, her queenly and bold stylistic choices, we wanted this piece to represent the flair she embodied. This is our homage to the royal body (broken, vulnerable, joyous, vibrant, and complex) that was Magdalena Carmen Frida Kahlo Y Calderon.”



Vendors/Items:

  • Red Tehuana de Cadenilla Dress, 1965 - @TodoFreshATX

  • Black skirts ($35 each) - @vidaantiguacollective

  • Flower coronas (from $65-$125) - @LasOfrendas

  • Jewelry + Accessories (Personal Collection) - @LasOfrendas

  • Vintage brooches and sequin dress (personal collection) - Stephanie J. Schiller

  • Patterned Secretary Blouse (Personal Collection - Stephanie J. Schiller

  • Designed Midi Skirt (SJDesigns, 2010) - Stephanie J. Schiller